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‘Cleanfluencers’ and Instagram’s 2020 obsession with organisation

‘Cleanfluencers’-and-Instagram’s-2020-obsession-with-organisation

‘Cleanfluencers’ and Instagram’s 2020 obsession with organisation


The once unglamorous world of cleaning is finding new polish as it edges into the world of wellness.

 

With more time spent at home, a pandemic sweeping the globe and a need to exercise some control, it is little wonder that 2020 was the backdrop for an obsession with cleanliness and organisation. “All any of us want to do right now is contain the chaos” wrote Pandora Sykes for Vogue.

This interest has been reflected on social media with a spike in content sharing domestic bliss. The most famous ‘cleanfluencer’ is Instagram star Mrs Hinch who has steadily been building 3.8m following over the past few years. She shares her experience of using cleaning to soothe anxiety and her followers reply with similar stories.

‘Cleanfluencers’-and-Instagram’s-2020-obsession-with-organisation

Similarly, millions follow Marie Kondo and The Home Edit on Instagram for their calming and immaculately organised content. The latter scored a Netflix series this year, which showed Joanna Teplin and Clea Shearer tidying the homes of celebrities and fans. The Guardian called it: The most 2020 show of 2020.

Meanwhile on TikTok, influencers like Imagine It Done, shares cleaning hacks and an inexplicable trend for showing off immaculately organised collections of La Creuset cookware temporarily swept the platform.

Cleaning goes luxe

 

Brands are responding to this more holistic and wellness-inspired approach to cleaning. In October, Aromatherapy Associates branched out of luxury beauty products with a new range of cleaning products. Combining therapeutic essential oil blends with cleaning formulas, the products promise to elevate the daily cleaning routine into a more luxurious self care experience. 

Lots of new brands are also attempting to tap into the broader ‘home wellness’ market, offering anti-pollution cleaning products, laundry detergents and air fresheners. Ali Shoraka, the founder of Sensori+, whose signature product in an all-natural air-detoxifying spray, told The Sydney Morning Herald: “I am confident that wellness is here to stay. Brands who will fail to adapt to the holistic wellbeing model will struggle to keep their connections to the consumer.”

The popularity of these new ventures shows that customers are willing to treat household cleaning as a therapeutic – even luxurious – experience. It also gives other brands in the space an opportunity to position themselves within the trend.

‘Cleanfluencers’-and-Instagram’s-2020-obsession-with-organisation

Why would a brand engage a cleanfluencer?

 

#1 Add personality to a sterile category

While we often talk of influencers ‘bringing brands to life’ Mrs Hinch and her pet names for her cleaning products (Dave the feather duster, Clarence the cloth, Pinky the pink sponge, you get the idea) has taken this to the next level. In sharing her personality and mental health struggles, she has amassed a loyal following and can humanise the brands she features.

While you might consider your products as everyday staples, influencers have the ability to transform them into so much more.

#2 Original tips and tricks

On social media, it’s often the most innovative and unexpected ideas that earn vitality. By allowing influencers to share their unique experiences of your product, you stand to benefit from a whole host of ideas you won’t have even thought of. We all have our own hacks and ways of doing things, give creators a chance to share theirs.

#3 Stand out with quality

At Vamp we know our community create high-quality work but even our jaws hit the floor when we saw their interpretation of a brief from bleach brand White King. Beautiful, imaginative and engaging images that perfectly showcased the brand in unexpected ways. Its content like this that can make a brand – however seemingly unsexy – stand out on social. Influencers are the experts in knowing what users want to see and delivering it.

‘Cleanfluencers’-and-Instagram’s-2020-obsession-with-organisation